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03
January
2018

More Art highlights for 2018

From celebrity closet gazing, through to fanfare openings and reopenings, surreal theatricality, Parisian delights and Michael Jackson, there is much on offer from the arts world to fill your diary from spring to winter this coming year. People’s wardrobes and what they chose to keep in them is their business. Unless they are very famous, when they become our business. Or, good business, in the case of the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A). Based in London’s South Kensington area, the V&A – one of the UK’s leading arts venues– has become a celebrity closet specialist. It did very well with an exhibition of David Bowie’s outfits in 2013, followed in 2015 by another dedicated to the fashion designer Alexander McQueen. The next popular icon to get the museum’s blockbuster frock treatment is the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, in its summer show: Frida Kahlo’s Wardrobe (16 June – 4 November). The wardrobe in question had been sealed for 50 years at her home – The Blue House (La Casa Azul) – in Mexico City. This was on the instruction of her husband, the muralist Diego Rivera, when Kahlo died aged 47 in 1954. More art highlights for 2018 * Bridget Riley at David Zwirner Gallery (19 January – 10 March) * Charles I: King and Collector at Royal Academy (27 Jan – 15 April) * Bacon and Freud at Tate Britain (28 February – 27 August) * Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern (8 March – 9 September) * Egon Schiele at Tate Liverpool (24 May – 23 September) * Ed Ruscha at the National Gallery (11 June – 7 October) * Mantegna and Bellini at the National Gallery (1 October – 27 January 2019) *

02
January
2018

GUIDE TO THE BIGGEST MUSEUM OPENINGS IN 2018

Our Complete Guide to the Biggest, Baddest, Boldest Museum Openings in 2018 From the London Museum of Photography to Cairo’s Grand Egyptian Museum, here are the openings—and reopenings—you need to know about in 2018. [https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2017/12/2-PineEntrance_MarkelCenter_ICAVCU-1024×581.jpg]A rendering of VCU’s Institute for Contemporary Art at the Markel Center. © Steven Holl Architects and the Institute for Contemporary Art, VCU. 2017 was a big year for new museum openings and expansions. In the US, the former Santa Monica Museum of Art re-opened as the Institute of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. The similarly named (but unrelated) Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami made its proper debut, and the Bass Museum moved into its new digs down the road. And not all the action was stateside: The Louvre Abu Dhabi launched in the United Arab Emirates, the new Tate outpost opened in Cornwall, and the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa was inaugurated in Cape Town. To be sure, 2017 will be hard to top, but 2018 has a few blueprints up its sleeve. We may not see the same number of new arrivals, but there are some big-time expansions and new operations worth keeping an eye on, including two new institutions dedicated to photography and the long-awaited arrival of the world’s largest archeological museum in Africa. So as you put 2017 in the rear view, here is our guide to the most interesting museum openings—and re-openings—in 2018: 1. Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) [https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2017/12/ICA-VCU-17-12-SHA-4280-1024×683.jpg] Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University. Photo by Iwan Baan. Courtesy of the Institute for Contemporary Art, VCU. ADVERTISING Opening Date: April 2018 Location: Richmond, Virgina Positioned at the entryway of VCU’s Monroe Park Campus in the middle of Richmond’s arts district, the new Institute for Contemporary Art is the largest privately funded arts project in the school’s history. The museum cost an estimated $41 million to build and was designed by Steven Holl Architects, the same firm that was responsible for two other major recent college art projects: the Visual Arts Building at the University of Iowa in 2016 and the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton, which opened earlier this year. The ICA is set to open in April with “Declaration,” an exhibition bringing together 30 artists whose work addresses a variety of social issues. 2. The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration Opening Date: April 2018 Location: Montgomery, Alabama This spring, the Equal Justice Initiative, a non-profit organization committed to fighting for racial and economic injustice, will open The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration. The museum will explore the “legacy of slavery, racial terrorism, segregation, and contemporary issues of mass incarceration, excessive punishment, and police violence” in the United States. Located in Montogomery, Alabama, the former capital of domestic slave trade in the state, on the site of a former slave warehouse, the institution will combine art (Sanford Biggers and Hank Willis Thomas are mentioned on EJI’s website), interactive media, and oral history across its exhibitions. 3. Nordic Museum [https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2018/01/NHM.MarketSt.Mithun.MIR_.10.20.17-1024×614.jpg] A rendering of the new Nordic Museum building. Design by Mithun. Image by Mir. Courtesy the Nordic Museum. Opening Date: May 2018 Location: Seattle, Washington The Nordic Heritage Museum has long outgrown the old elementary school building it moved into when it was founded 1980. Finally, in the spring of next year, the museum will move into a new 57,000-square-foot home in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, and rebrand itself as the Nordic Museum. The building, which cost upwards of $45 million, will be wrapped in a “vertically striated zinc skin,” while inside, tall, angular white walls will invoke the glacier planes of a fjord. 4. Grand Egyptian Museum [https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2017/12/GettyImages-479075730-1024×682.jpg] Construction at the new Grand Egyptian Museum near the Giza pyramids in Cairo. Photo: KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images. Opening Date: May 2018 Location: Cairo, Egypt The Grand Egyptian Museum might be the most impressive structure built in Cairo since the Giza pyramids—which, appropriately, are just over a mile away from the new building’s location. The institution has been in the works for over a decade now and has come to cost nearly $1 billion in total (paid by a combination private donations, funds from the Egyptian government, and a loan from a Japanese bank). However, the end is in sight: The mega-museum is scheduled to open in May 2018, with a blockbuster exhibition revealing King Tut’s tomb. The museum expects visitor numbers to be in the tens of thousands per day; it’s part of a plan to reinvigorate the country’s flailing tourism industry. Designed by the Dublin-based architecture firm Heneghan Peng—which was awarded the job after winning one of the largest architectural competitions in history—the 650,000-square-foot building will be the permanent home to hundreds of thousands of ancient artifacts, a substantial amount of which have never before been shown to the public. 5. Victoria & Albert Museum of Design, Dundee [https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2018/01/Construction-Sep-2017_Large-1200px-1024×683.jpg] The Victoria & Albert Museum of Design, Dundee. Photo by Ross Fraser McLean. Courtesy the Victoria & Albert Museum. Opening Date: Summer 2018 Location: Dundee, Scotland One of two Victoria & Albert Museum outposts planned for 2018, the Museum of Design in Dundee, Scotland aims to bring a fresh, accessible perspective to the field while highlighting the country’s rich design heritage. The buzzed-about building is designed by Kengo Kuma, the same architect responsible for the Olympic stadium in Tokyo in 2020. It cost over $100 million—almost double its original estimate—and will be located on the bank of the River Tay. The museum is one of the central components of the Scottish city’s 30-year, $1.3 billion waterfront transformation. 6. Photography Centre at the Victoria & Albert Museum [https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2017/12/dka-170602-vanda-photography-centre-1024×512.jpg] A rendering of the new Photography Centre at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. Courtesy the V&A Museum and David Kohn Architects. Opening Date: Fall 2018 Location: London, England Announced earlier this year, the second V&A expansion project planned for 2018 is a new photography center on the museum’s campus in central London. The new building will house the museum’s own collection of photography—one of the most substantial in the world, with over 500,000 works. It will also house the collection of the Royal Photographic Society—with over 270,000 works—which was controversially relocated from its former home at the National Media Museum to the V&A in 2016. Together, the two collections form the world’s single largest photography collection. Designed by David Kohn Architects, the new building will double the amount of exhibition currently reserved for photography at the museum. 7. Glenstone Museum [Glenstone Museum expansion. Rendering courtesy of Thomas Phifer & Partners and the Glenstone Museum.] Glenstone Museum expansion. Rendering courtesy of Thomas Phifer & Partners and the Glenstone Museum. Opening Date: Late 2018 Location: Potomac, Maryland By any measure, Glenstone, founded in 2006 by collectors Mitchell and Emily Rales in Potomac, Maryland, is already a big art institution. But its new expansion, slated to be finished in late ’18, will make it one of the largest private museums in the world. Designed by Thomas Phifer, the new expansion will add a new museum building with 50,000 square feet of exhibition space, an arrival hall, an entry pavilion, a bookstore, multiple cafes, and an additional 100 acres of land for the sculpture garden. 8. London Museum of Photography [https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2018/01/1345_10_Whitechapel_Pavilion_Dusk_View_01_03-1024×864.jpg] A rendering of the White Chapel Building. Courtesy the Derwent London. Opening Date: Late 2018 Location: London, England Fotografiska, a forward-thinking museum for contemporary photography, opened in Stockholm in 2010. Now, the founders of that museum—brothers Jan and Per Broman—are planning to bring their vision to London. Located in the east end of the UK capital, down the block from the Whitechapel Gallery, the London Museum of Photography will occupy 89,000 square feet in a new Fletcher Priest-designed building. The privately funded, for-profit venue will host exhibitions year-round. And the Broman brothers are not done: They also reportedly signed a lease for a six-story building in New York this summer, suggesting that another museum might soon be on the horizon.

27
December
2017

2017 Art World Exhibitions

As 2017 draws to a close and the Art World gets ready for the next year of Art Fairs, Exhibitions and Gallery Openings, it seems fitting to reflect on some of the successes the Art World has experienced over 2017. Louvre Abu Dhabi The opening of the Abu Dhabi’s Louvre in November 2017 provided a new cultural space within the Middle Eastern Art Market. The Museum’s Galleries showcase twelve chapters based on ‘shared humanity,’ spanning from ancient artworks to more contemporary pieces, paired with items borrowed from the French Museums.[1] This culmination of ancient Eastern works and contemporary European pieces presents a cohesive and unifying structure for the Museum’s new UAE location. Should you wish to visit, the current exhibition runs from December 21st 2017 to April 2018 and explores the origins of the Louvre in 17th and 18th Century. Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi It would be difficult to miss out arguably the biggest success of the Art World this year; Christie’s hosted the sale of the record breaking piece at over $450 million (£342 million) in New York in November of this year.[2] The price tag attached to the painting made it the most expensive sold at auction, but also echoes the scarcity of da Vinci paintings on the market[3] (ironic considering almost sixty years earlier the piece sold for just £45 at Sotheby’s)! The Louvre Abu Dhabi is set to become the home of the masterpiece – another reason to visit! The Michelangelo Exhibition Heralded “the show of the year” by the Observer, and said to contain, “more masterpieces-per-foot that we might ever see in New York,” the exhibition continues the success of the Old Masters this year.[4] The Exhibition contains over one hundred of Michelangelo’ drawings, a selection of sculptures and a collection of other pieces. The exhibition can be viewed in The Metropolitan Museum of New York and continues until February 2018, so tickets are still available if you find yourself in New York over Christmas. Art Basel Cities: Buenos Aires November proved to be a popular month for Art successes in 2017. The renowned Art Basel launched ‘Art Basel Cities’ in March of 2016 and announced its first partner to be Buenos Aires this year. It’s due to run in September of 2018 and is directed by High Line Art Chief Curator Cecilia Alemani.[5] The initiative is backed by Art Basel Cities Exchange, also launched in November, which aims to “create a stronger, more connected Art World” through art collaborations across the globe.[6] Frieze Young People’s Programme 2017 Frieze partnered with The Showroom, Whitechapel Gallery and educators in art to inform London Sixth Form Students about the variety of employment options in the Art World. [7] Frieze Education offers workshops for students from varying socio-economic backgrounds to inspire young people to join the Art Industry and visit the Art Fair itself. Frieze’s Education Programme isn’t new, however the inclusion of young aspiring art professionals in the industry is something that more focus has been placed on in recent years and ultimately keeps the industry fresh – a worthy on-going success of 2017. Museum of Contemporary Art Launch Toby’s Prize The Museum in Cleveland launched a new artist award named after the collector Toby Devan Lewis in December 2017. The prize comes with a $50,000 reward, half dedicated as prize money and half towards funding artistic production.[8] The artist prize coincides with the Museum’s 50th anniversary, establishing a fitting event to mark the occasion.[9] Alongside the monetary prize, the winner also receives a dedicated exhibition comprising of the artist’s own works.[10] MOCA’s support of emerging artists and arts experimentation is certainly noted. Masterpiece 2017 Earlier in the year Masterpiece’s annual Art Fair saw a record number of visitors; 44,000 art enthusiasts, Art World Professionals and educators visited the Fair in West London, not to mention the 8,500 that were present for the preview.[11] Not only did the fair achieve record visitors and sales, it also successfully launched the ‘Masterpiece Presents’ initiative. The new exhibition space greets guests at the entrance and provides an “immersive installation”, this year adopted by Iván Navarro.[12] Masterpiece 2018 looks to be just as glamourous as 2017! The Art World has provided some surprising and notable events and successes over the past year which will hopefully continue to inspire more budding artists into the scene throughout 2018. To all the art enthusiasts, Art Professionals, Art Educators, Artists and indeed the whole Art World, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from Alchemy!

21
December
2017

CHRISTMAS

Christmas Are you looking for unique Christmas gifts? We have lots of stunning art inspired gifts, sculpture, ceramics and artwork at Coastal Gallery Lymington that make perfect gifts for your loved ones. Whether you are looking for a stocking filler or a statement gift , we have something to suit every budget. We have a wide range of work available and we are receiving new deliveries at the gallery every day, so make sure to pop in regularly! You can browse our website to get a better idea of what we have to offer across different media, or check on our latest Facebook posts or twitter. Thank you to all our customers in 2017 and looking forward to presenting all our new work and exhibitions programme for 2018.

14
December
2017

TATE MODERN – THE KABAKOVS

The Kabakovs are amongst the most celebrated artists of their generation, widely known for their large-scale installations and use of fictional personas. Critiquing the conventions of art history and drawing upon the visual culture of the former Soviet Union – from dreary communal apartments to propaganda art and its highly optimistic depictions of Soviet life – their work addresses universal ideas of utopia and fantasy; hope and fear. The exhibition charts the Kabakovs’ incredible artistic journey, from the early paintings, drawings, albums and sculptural works made by Ilya working as an ‘unofficial’ artist in his Moscow studio from the 1960s, through to his move to New York in the late 1980s – a turning point which marked the beginning of his collaboration with Emilia on immersive and often large-scale installations. Including architectural models of realised and unrealised utopian projects and public sculptures, the exhibition demonstrates the breadth of the Kabakovs’ practice. Three major and rarely exhibited ‘total’ installations will be presented together for the first time: The Man Who Flew into Space from His Apartment 1985, Labyrinth (My Mother’s Album)1990 and Not Everyone Will Be Taken Into the Future 2001. Appearing as if they have been recently vacated, these uncanny environments draw spectators into the absurd and moving stories of these often fictional characters. Coinciding with the centenary of the 1917 Russian Revolution, the exhibition Not Everyone Will Be Taken Into the Future explores the role of the artist in society in uncertain times. … To sum up: The way ahead is with Malevich alone. But only a few will be taken – the best. Those whom the headmaster chooses – HE KNOWS WHOM. Ilya Kabakov, ‘Not Everyone Will Be Taken Into the Future’, A-YA, issue 5, 1983. Not Everyone Will Be Taken Into the Future and Red Star Over Russia present the unique visual culture that arose from this momentous period in world history, and the artistic responses of a generation that followed. The exhibition is organised by Tate Modern in collaboration with the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg and the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow. Right [Ilya Kabakov The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment] Ilya Kabakov The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment 1985 Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. Musée national d’art moderne/Centre de Création industrielle. Purchase, 1990 © Ilya & Emilia Kabakov [Ilya and Emilia Kabakov The Collage of Spaces # 6] Ilya and Emilia Kabakov The Collage of Spaces # 6 2010 Private Collection © Ilya and Emilia Kabakov Photo Courtesy of the Artists [Ilya Kabakov Holiday #1] Ilya Kabakov Holiday #1 1987 Tsukanov Family Foundation © Ilya Kabakov Photo Courtesy of the Artists [Ilya and Emilia Kabakov How to Meet an Angel] Ilya and Emilia Kabakov How to Meet an Angel 1998 Private Collection © Ilya and Emilia Kabakov Photo Courtesy of the Artists

02
December
2017

December Exhibitions – London

Rose Wylie: Quack Quack Serpentine Sackler, London This major exhibition represents a new career high for Rose Wylie RA, presenting both her colourful, large-scale paintings and works on paper. Her exuberant art, often inspired by popular culture and childhood memories, has been winning over critics ever since the artist was “discovered” in her late seventies – in the past seven years, she’s had shows at Tate Britain and Turner Contemporary, won prestigious awards and been elected a Senior Royal Academician. As Wylie puts it, “I married early and had children, and so I didn’t paint for a long time, but that wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. I’d been through a lot, and thought a lot, and I came back to my work afresh.”

15
November
2017

PAINTING IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Painting in the Digital Age London based gallery Sophia Contemporary launched a new show exploring how the rise of the Internet and the constant consumption of online images is influencing contemporary painting and painters. “Im/material: Painting in the Digital Age” showcases the work of eight young artists whose practices focus on this theme. With ArtRabbit being an online platform, and all things digital being close to our hearts, we were particularly curious to learn more – direct from the artists’ mouth. In our first studio interview we talked to Ry David Bradley about his explorations into the nature of painting as it collides with network cultures. Ry discusses his ‘uncapturable’ paintings and what he believes to be the role of the artist in an age of continual visual documentation and instantaneous reportage. Ry’s work is on display at Sophia Contemporary through 17 November 2017.

01
November
2017

Exhibition in London – Starts Today November 1st

A Farewell to Art: Chagall, Shakespeare and Prospero Ben Uri: Art. Identity. Migration 1 November – 26 February 2017 A rare opportunity to see Marc Chagall’s illustrations for The Tempest in an exhibition exploring the play’s significance for the artist. [https://www.artfund.org/thumbnail/686/assets/what-to-see/exhibitions/2017/11/farewell-to-art/chagall-tempest.jpg] Marc Chagall, Illustration from The Tempest, 1975 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS London In Shakespeare’s last complete play, the exiled king, Prospero, gives up his magical powers and drowns his book. Many have taken this as symbolic of the end of Shakespeare’s own writing career, and when Marc Chagall, at the age of 88, produced the illustrations for the 1975 André Sauret edition, this in turn was interpreted as a personal farewell to art. For the first time in the UK, 50 works from this limited edition portfolio are on display, exploring the interplay between the text and the artworks. In particular the exhibition focuses on the parallels between Chagall’s own experience as a refugee and the themes of exile and creativity in the story. Leaving his home town in Russia to settle in Paris, Chagall was later forced out during the Nazi occupation and fled to the US in 1941. The ‘tempest’ of 20th century European Jewish history was a personal reality, and he might well have found its reflection in Shakespeare’s last work. How his poetic figurative style relates to Shakespeare’s aristocratic characters is also examined.

17
October
2017

Tate Britain – Until Sunday February 4th

It’s what’s on the inside that counts, at least that’s what my mum says. Rachel Whiteread must have been told the same thing growing up, because the influential British sculptor (and first female winner of the Turner Prize back in 1993) is singularly obsessed with the inside of objects. Over a 25-year career, she has managed to create a powerful, defined, unique aesthetic by disregarding the outside of things and instead examining the emptiness within, often to devastatingly emotional effect. You walk into this show to be confronted by a city turned to ash. The early works are casts of the negative space of a fireplace, a bath, a closet, a hot-water bottle; it looks like the fossilised remains of the entire contents of a lost home. All the walls in the gallery have been pulled out to create an open space, so you can’t really walk through this show chronologically. Instead you stumble from monumental sculpture to monumental sculpture, dwarfed by concrete, plaster and resin. Mattresses lie across one wall, doors and windows across another, a staircase leads to nothing in the middle of the room, a row of bookshelves holds no books, only the impression of them. Tate Britain hasn’t bothered with wall texts here, and the info handout’s pretty flimsy, so it’s left out some important emotional context as a result. The newer works aren’t that exciting either, nor are the works on paper. And you can’t help feeling that most of the bigger works would be happier outside, heaving their heft about in the real world. It all feels a bit mausoleum-ish, like a builders’ merchant in a funeral parlour. But that doesn’t eclipse how great and important most of Whiteread’s art is. There are roots to it – the minimalism of Carl Andre, the resinous structures of Eva Hesse – but she aims for the gut. She uses the ideas of abstraction and minimalism to document very real things. These are tombstones, concrete effigies of moments that are gone for good. There’s death here, lost love and youth. The house that staircase was in is gone, the years she spent sleeping on that mattress are too. This is work about time passing. It screams with thousands of lived moments that are gone for ever, and this is all that remains.

29
September
2017

FRIEZE SCULPTURE 2017

Frieze Sculpture 2017 A free outdoor display in London’s Regent’s Park, 5 July to 8 October Frieze Sculpture is open from 5 July to 8 October, presenting a free outdoor display throughout the summer months. Selected by Clare Lilley (Director of Programme, Yorkshire Sculpture Park) and featuring leading international galleries, Frieze’s first-ever summer display in theEnglish Gardens of The Regent’s Park brings together 25 new and significant works by leading 20th-century and contemporary artists from around the world, including: Magdalena Abakanowicz, Rasheed Araeen, Urs Fischer, KAWS, Alicja Kwade, Michael Craig-Martin, Ugo Rondinone and Sarah Sze.